Bond 25 theme song


#161

With Lady Gaga certainly winning the Oscar this year, and her having the chops to not only croon wonderfully but also to write a song that will bring in major publicity and chart topping success…

… is there anyone in doubt that EON has already contacted her? DC will be at the Oscars anyway and could approach her personally to seal the deal.


#162

Oh no doubt.


#163

Lady Gaga has probably been in the conversation for potential title singers at EON but I imagine after A Star Is Born she is now at the top of their list.


#164

Lady Gaga has moved beyond straight pop now - she has a big audience for her Jazz/more classic rock sounding stuff (album with Tony Bennett, Joanne and obv a Star Is Born now) - she is much less polarizing so I could see her easily - probably take at who is on Universal Records since they are distributing internationally (it includes Lady Gaga and Taylor Swift amongst many others)


#165

I think she could absolutely slay a Bond theme but I’m not sure she’d go for it now that she is courting more artistic credibility. I’d be very happy to be wrong though,


#166

idk if shes really courting anything beyond Adele, I think Bond is seen as prestige enough it wouldn’t be an issue


#167

Can’t stand Germanotta, one of the most overrated artists of all time.

I’d rather they avoid her like the plague.


#168

I thought so, too - until I saw her in A STAR IS BORN. And then I came across her jazz music.

She is really talented, if you like her or not.


#169

#170

Anyone who can do Dame Julie Andrews justice has my vote!


#171

I’ve only half-heartedly endorsed them in the Craig era, since they’d really just been a shell of their former selves musically for the entire duration of the Craig era, but after the release of the brilliant Songs of Experience, it’s time for EON to bring U2 in to do a proper Bond theme.

Half of the band is responsible for the last great Bond theme. The other half gave us the best cinematic interpretation of the Mission: Impossible theme. One of the greatest and most enduring rock bands of all-time. This needs to happen at some point in the franchise.


#172

Arctic Monkeys are probably due around now too - been around for a long time and reliably their albums go #1 in the UK and do very well internationally


#173

The Arctic Monkeys would fantastic; poetry, irony, sultry and cinematic when necessary.

Alex Turner May be the best song writer (imo) in the world right now.

If he’s not into it, then The other great northern songwriter of our times, Noel Gallagher (and his band The High Flying Birds) would do a cracking job.


#174

As long as it’s not sam smith again, I’m fine with most anyone.


#175

Too bad they’ve lost the ability to write a really great songs. They haven’t composed anything really grand since All That You Can’t Leave Behind (Stuck In A Moment You Can’t Get Out Of, Walk On). And to be clear, I love U2. It is, and probably forever will be, my favourite band of all time.


#176

I would only disagree slightly with your overall thoughts on their post 2000 career, as I would consider Songs of Experience to be their fourth masterpiece alongside The Joshua Tree, Achtung Baby, and All That You Can’t Leave Behind. I might even put it ahead of ATYCLB, which while a masterpiece, is buoyed a bit by the insanely good live shows they were putting on around that time.

How to Dismantle an Atomic Bomb had some good tracks on it as well (“Origin of the Species”, “Sometimes You Can’t Make it On Your Own”, and “Vertigo”). But, for me, Songs of Experience is on a completely different level, one that I didn’t think U2 would ever return to. “The Little Things that Give You Away” is perhaps my favorite U2 song since Achtung Baby, and reminds me a bit of the kind of sweep that “Where the Streets Have No Name” has. If U2 could put something similar to that over Kleinman’s titles, I’d be absolutely thrilled. The album as a whole, while not having any huge standouts like previous efforts that would command radio attention, is just a delight the entire way through.

They definitely don’t have the important things to say that they used to, although I’m hoping the current political climate will get them back to that similar to how they railed against the ills of the world in the 80s and early 90s, but for me Songs of Experience proves that they’ve still got it, and EON should correct the mistake of not having featured them yet while the iron is currently hot.


#177

Agreed on ATYCLB. It was half masterpiece - half… so so, but the shows… I’ve probably watched Slain Castle a hundred times. Pure genius.
I agree that Songs of Experience is very mature, far superior to the Songs of Innocence, which was so blank, so dull, that I remember seriously thinking that if they are to record that kind of mediocrity, they might as well break up (sic!) because they’re ruining their legend and their legacy.
Anyway, they say that we tend to like more the things we already know. Music is not as important part of my life these days, so perhaps Songs of Experience didn’t get my attention enough. While listening I was desperately trying to find a song that would make me think: “that’s it! That’s U2 I love” but found none. An instant classic. A powerful, moving song.
By the way, the last song that I really loved from day one was Moment Of Surrender from otherwise medicore No Line on the Horizon.
I don’t miss the political manifestos that much, though. They pushed it a little bit to hard in mid 2000, and the shows were sometimes, well, annoying.
Still, it’s U2. So I wouldn’t mind of they were to write Bond 25 song.


#178

I’m not a big fan of where U2 have gone in their dotage; a kind of ‘wall of pop’. All worthy top 10’ers, but none particularly memorable imho.

However, if they could get their mojo back (I like that track) and give us a Bond theme in the vain of Unforgettable Fire, Desire, or God - Part II, then I’d be extremely happy.


#179

Speaking of U2… one director I’d love to see considered for a Bond film is Anton Corbijn, who directs a lot of U2’s videos. His 2 theatrical films are “A Most Wanted Man” and “The American,” a movie I think is highly underrated.


#180

The American is an excellent, understated character piece. If they ever adapted Pearson’s Bond biography such a character study would be apt.

However, for such a cerebral and complex movie there’s other directors higher on my list for it. With much of its story dependant upon shifts back and forth in time the chops of Nolan, or the combo of Scorsese & Schoonmaker, or indeed CJF would be ideal.

Not such a fan of Corbijn’s A Most Wanted Man. Really wanted to like that movie, but in the end I found it a collection of nice, if showboating performance, but little else. Ultimately I thought it was strong on tone and posture, but weak on content.

Felt the same about Alfredson’s Tinker, Tailer, Soldier, Spy. Fantastic performances and tone, but ultimately failed to deliver on resolving the story beats; though that’s symptomatic of this story simply needing more time to be told. You can’t cut Smilie’s solving of the case down to a montage involving him sat in an armchair pondering/waiting.

But I digress, Corbijn is certainly an interesting Director who’s more than transcended a long and distinguished promo career. There’s also the 2007 Ian Curtis biopic Control, which had Stella reviews and I heard nothing but great things about (must get around to watching it someday).

Bringing my rambling back to this thread, he’s worked with Depeche Mode a lot, as well as The Killers on the best track they’ve ever done (imo) All These Things That I’ve Done.

Both bands must surely make appearances on Eon’s list for every Bond movie. I’d love to see Depeche Mode get the nod and I’m sure The Killers would be a popular choice.

If the latter did Bond, then something as anthemic and classic as the afformentioned track would be amazing. Alternatively something edgy like Somebody Told Me, or The Man. But, please, not the soft-rock-pop stuff that pads out their singles and albums.