What are you reading?

Not at all - the article could have mentioned it :wink:

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Either way, I now have a whole new series to read from one of my favorite authors. So I’m happy.

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I’m currently roaring through the third Thursday Murder Club installment, The Bullet That Missed. The bullet may have missed, but Richard Osman’s wit never does. Wonderful stuff!

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By Royal Command by Charlie Higson. I thought I’d read all of it, but only realised recently that i hadn’t because i moved to Uni for 4 years just after it came out. It’s really good!

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I just finished WAMTK. A decent, enjoyable read. Anthony Horowitz can leave on a high note. However, I do find it my least favorite of Horowitz’s trilogy. It could be a bit depressing at times, but it did prove that Book Bond could survive without Fleming material. I especially liked how it wrapped all the villains up, with the ghost of Scaramanga being a constant pain of Bond’s mental and physical health. I wish Mary Goodnight would have made an appearance, just to lighten the tone. I could see WAMTK leading into Colonel Sun and Solo. Next, another alternate Fleming Timeline Sequel: Devil May Care by Sebastian Faulks.

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It’s a good book, but that was my feeling too.

I’m currently re reading ’ cover her face ’ I enjoy the Dalgleish character and the current TV version is quite good. Watching it has turned me back to the novels.

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Moonraker again. I’m working on something. It’s still a fine read.

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When I reread it two weeks ago I was surprised that I had forgotten Bond willing to face death in the rocket flames… being apparently the inspiration for NTTD‘s ending.

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I also love that Gala doesn’t try to talk him out of it and is steadfast that there must be be another way, but if not, she’s willing to stand with him. She’s still one of the best written Fleming Bond girls.

“She knows how to kick and where and can probably break my arm more easily than I could break her’s.” :wink:

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This list is wrong. Sebastian Faulks should be at the bottom of the list. I just finished Devil May Care. Faulks pulled a Superman Returns/Star Wars The Force Awakens with this book. It just feels like a greatest hits book. I’ll give him points in two areas: him breaking out of his comfort zone and writing a thriller. Even though he didn’t really succeed on a action level. Second, his characterization of Dr. Julius Gorner. When Barbara Broccoli said Safin would the villain to get under Bond’s skin, she lied. Of recent Bond villains across all media, Julius Gorner and Kobus Breed are by far worse human beings. At least their authors didn’t try to make them sympathetic. Overall, I liked Scarlett as a Bond girl. I wish she was in the story more. I also wish that Bond could have shared some scenes with Felix Leiter and Rene Mathis. Just for the sake of showing their friendships. Final thoughts, I’m happy with the book, but I’m even more happy that Sebastian Faulks didn’t comeback. He doesn’t seem fond of his time with Bond, he never answers Tweets about it and heavily criticized Skyfall. At least Jeffery Deaver tried something different with Carte Blanche. And respects the fans of his time with James Bond. The number one thing I hope IFP learned from the experience is that NO ONE can write as Ian Fleming.

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I just finished WAMTK. A decent, enjoyable read. Anthony Horowitz can leave on a high note. However, I do find it my least favorite of Horowitz’s trilogy. It could be a bit depressing at times, but it did prove that Book Bond could survive without Fleming material. I especially liked how it wrapped all the villains up, with the ghost of Scaramanga being a constant pain of Bond’s mental and physical health. I wish Mary Goodnight would have made an appearance, just to lighten the tone. I could see WAMTK leading into Colonel Sun and Solo. Next, another alternate Fleming Timeline Sequel: Devil May Care by Sebastian Faulks.

This list is wrong. Sebastian Faulks should be at the bottom of the list. I just finished Devil May Care. Faulks pulled a Superman Returns/Star Wars The Force Awakens with this book. It just feels like a greatest hits book. I’ll give him points in two areas: him breaking out of his comfort zone and writing a thriller. Even though he didn’t really succeed on a action level. Second, his characterization of Dr. Julius Gorner. When Barbara Broccoli said Safin would the villain to get under Bond’s skin, she lied. Of recent Bond villains across all media, Julius Gorner and Kobus Breed are by far worse human beings. At least their authors didn’t try to make them sympathetic. Overall, I liked Scarlett as a Bond girl. I wish she was in the story more. I also wish that Bond could have shared some scenes with Felix Leiter and Rene Mathis. Just for the sake of showing their friendships. Final thoughts, I’m happy with the book, but I’m even more happy that Sebastian Faulks didn’t comeback. He doesn’t seem fond of his time with Bond, he never answers Tweets about it and heavily criticized Skyfall. At least Jeffery Deaver tried something different with Carte Blanche. And respects the fans of his time with James Bond.In Carte Blanche, people complain that James Bond is not written as he should be. In the wake of the metoo movement, if that book was published by today’s standards, not many would complain. James Bond is meant to reflect modern times as much as possible, it would make sense to write him that way today. It was just written a few years too early. The number one thing I hope IFP learned from the experience is that NO ONE can write as Ian Fleming.

After reflecting on WAMTK, I can be grateful that it changed the main villain’s plot. Ever since Devil May Care, the villain’(s) plots have alternated between the two. DMC-Drugs. CB-Doomsday Machine. Solo-Drugs. TM-Doomsday Machine. FAAD-Drugs. It was getting as old as Bond quitting or resigning from the average Purvis and Wade script. At least Anthony Horowitz didn’t do one or the other again.

Also, I recently read Giant the 1952 novel by Edna Ferber. It inspired the classic 1956 film. I noticed that Jett Rink (James Dean) isn’t in the book as much as the movie. Currently reading Watchmen (1986).

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Just finished reading Colonel Sun. Sorry for the late reply, there have been a few problems in my personal and work lives. Overall, very impressed. Great opening and ending. Middle did drag on a bit. I wish we could have had more of Colonel Sun himself in the book. He was DEFINITELY a great villain. If there’s one thing that I will defend Purvis and Wade on, they aren’t afraid to look back at CS for ideas. If we never get a full film adaptation, at least some writers (including Anthony Horowitz) have ranked it as one of the great Bond adventures. It fits right in with Ian Fleming’s best work.

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Thanks for your review, and I hope your problems have been alleviated.

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Thank you for comment and concern. There’s still some issues going on now, but it’ll be a slow healing process. James Bond has definitely helped with the escapism that I need.

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Being Bond: A Daniel Craig Retrospective by Mark Salisbury. A great easy read, with some noticeable references, in particular with the “what if” departments. It does seem that Craig got almost too much creative control at times. I look at this as a mixed bag. EON should step back for the next Bond with this. It read (in the book, at least) like EON was too loyal to him, especially when Connery and Brosnan wanted just a bit of that creative control. Purvis and Wade are truly good ideas men. For those of you who thought that Bond and Blofeld shouldn’t have been brothers, here’s a shocker. I think that John Logan’s idea of making Blofeld a woman was worse. Those are just a few of the many interesting things I found out about DC’s time as Bond. A great interesting read. I wouldn’t be surprised if EON tries John Logan’s idea of filming two movies back to back soon. In particular if Amazon is putting part of the money up.

I finished the novelizations of the original Indiana Jones trilogy, on New Year’s Eve. Greatly enjoyable. It actually saddens me that Lucasfilm didn’t keep Indy going as a book series. There is A LOT of potential for Indy to succeed in today’s audience to enjoy. I also enjoyed the Crystal Skull novelization and The Army of the Dead by Steve Perry. I wish that Dial of Destiny would have been made into a novelization, Lucasfilm does it for almost all their other movies.

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I see that argument. The 2006 reboot only lasted five films because of Daniel Craig. There’s no reason whatsoever why it couldn’t have run long term if EON wanted to put their foot down. Would have Craig walked if his preference to kill Bond wasn’t met? Possibly. If so, EON saw more value in squeezing out one more film with an actor perceived to be too good to lose. I wanted another Craig movie too, and I’m glad we got it. In the end, I don’t think starting again matters all that much. Another Bond will step into the role and reboot is just a word as far as more adventures are concerned.

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Stumbled across copies of Icebreaker and Nobody Lives Forever at a used book store. Blasted through both pretty quick. Icebreaker was a bit of a let down (I had always been intrigued by the title). Nobody Lives Forever on the other hand was a ton of fun. The amount of double crossing in these two books is pretty insane, but NLF had some fun sequences, one genuinely unnerving encounter, and a fun villain lair. In all, I’d say give Icebreaker a pass but if you haven’t yet, check out Nobody Lives Forever. It definitely scratched the itch.

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Thought I’d post this here in case any of the readers here have read a Greg Iles book along the way…

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Oh man, what a tough road! I have been a Greg Iles fan ever since the one-two punch of his WWII espionage thrillers Spandau Phoenix and Black Cross. He will be in my prayers.

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